Myopia

Inspiration for the song

The next song to be released from my upcoming solo album is ‘Myopia’.

This is the darkest and heaviest track on the album. I wanted to write a song that captured the sense of disorientation I have experienced when following the news in the latter stages of the last decade. A lot of situations surrounding this may have occurred as a result of short sightedness and decision making based on the short term as opposed to the long term.

All the while there is the ever present and existential threat of climate change and the warnings from experts of the short amount of time we have left to do something about it.

Lyrics

There are some out there who would let the world burn 

If it’s for profit or self gain 

There are some who would let their pride get in the way

and steer us all off the rails 

There are some who will use their position of power

To exploit those around them 

There are some who lack so much compassion 

to question what virtue remains 

This is our world 

Our fragile world 

Before the wildfire spreads 

And the storms come raging in

Before our oceans drown in plastic 

Before our children suffer 

Let us look beyond our myopia 

Credits

RME – Guitars, Vocals, Moog, Keyboards

Emma Davidson – Backing Vocals

Ben Elliott – Bass Guitar

Aled Lloyd – Drums

Produced by RME and Andrew Bishop

Recording and Mixing Engineer – Andrew Bishop

Mastering Engineer – Steve Kitch

Artwork – Darlee Urbiztondo

Fear Inoculum

Tool’s latest record is a compelling listen, and I couldn’t be any happier.

It just goes to show how powerful Tool’s influence is; when you have a world where people are overwhelmed with information and access to the entire history of music, as well as more entertainment forms than ever, they can release an album to an audience that has held a high level of anticipation for 13 years and cause a ruckus.

To the point where they were the number 1 trend on Youtube for the beginning of August and are currently competing with Taylor Swift in the charts.

I’ve always had my ears out for a new record. I love all of their discography but particularly like the hugely ambitious turn they took in the noughties with Lateralus and 10,000 days. The former being my absolute favourite.

A large part of Tool’s audience prefer Undertow or Aenima but what connects all Tool fans is there is always something to discuss about their music. It’s no wonder that there has usually been 5 years between each release because the level of depth and sophistication of each record is remarkable.

I honestly thought at some points, we would never see another Tool album. There seemed to be so many obstacles in the way, other commitments, family, musical endeavours, Maynard’s vineyard or potentially legal issues.

Making a record is elusive and when you want to release something that is inspired and fulfilling to oneself, it just takes time. It’s difficult to tell how long how much time it will take.

Fear Inoculum appears to cover many themes, namely the number seven and growing older and wiser, but as per usual when it comes to Tool, unpacking all themes requires patience, multiple listens and your undivided attention.

That’s what I gave this record, the first day it was released. I shut the curtains, played it through my speakers and sat there listening to the 80 minute opus and it was a zen like experience.

The sound of the album is absolutely incredible. Everything sounds gorgeous and there is a phenomenal amount of care that has been taken in designing the sonic landscape.

Since then, I can’t stop going back to listen to it.

The new album is not just a win for Tool fans but Music itself. This is the reason why.

In a world where popular and pandering for approval has run amok and the majors are signing teens that are singing about nothing that would remotely shift the culture. Tool stand their ground by doing things their own way, experimenting, taking their time and doing it all on their terms. You may not like this record, you may even hate it. That’s okay though, this record isn’t for you. But for those of us who love it…

13 years later, we finally have a new Tool album to immerse ourselves into.

And as grateful as I am to hear Fear Inoculum.

I hope it won’t be the last record they make.

Grey Day

My second single ‘Grey Day’ is released today.

You can listen to it on various platforms via the links below:

This is the first song I wrote entirely on piano. The result is a melancholy ballad about the worst possible days we can experience and getting ourselves through those moments.

Here are the credits:

RME – Vocals/Piano/String arrangements/Guitars

Emma Davidson – Bass Guitar

Ben Elliott – Bass Guitar

Aled Lloyd – Drums

Jiffy Griffiths – Percussion

Andrew Bishop – Recording and Mixing Engineer

Steve Kitch – Mastering Engineer

Darlee Urbiztondo – Artwork

https://open.spotify.com/track/2941DUvm0e1uiAYQX39Rs9?si=EmfudmhWREyL3gLt-AEeyQ

Anything is Possible – Debut Single

Anything is Possible, my debut single is now available to buy and stream.

Below are the links to the following. A lyric video is available on YouTube, you can buy a hi res version of the track on Band Camp or alternatively, you can stream it on Spotify, Apple Music and all other streaming services.

A huge thanks to everyone involved in making this music happen.

Here the credits:

Music and lyrics written and arranged by Ryan Mark Elliott 

RME – Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards, Producer 
Emma Davidson – Backing Vocals 
Ben Elliott – Bass Guitar 
Jiffy Griffiths – Percussion 
Aled Lloyd – Drums 

Andrew Bishop – Producer, Recording and Mixing Engineer 
Steve Kitch – Mastering Engineer 

Darlee Urbiztondo – Artwork

A huge thanks to the tremendously talented bunch of people listed above. I am humbled by the heart and soul you put into this project and I immensely enjoyed working with you all.

This track was inspired by the novel with the same title by American writer Elizabeth Strout. One of the main characters becomes a writer and moves to a city far away from her home. I read it at a time when something very similar happened to myself!

Musical style wise, I’ve never written a track with as many pop sensibilities as this. It’s kind of a blend of New Wave (influenced by Tears for Fears and Sting) as well as Dream Pop (Mew and Beach House) there’s also a bit of funk in there too!

Anyways, I hope you enjoy it!

Ryan Mark Elliott – Anything is Possible Lyric Video

Anything is Possible on Spotify

Anything is Possible on Band Camp

Mark Hollis

A few weeks ago, we received the sad news that Mark Hollis of Talk Talk had passed away at 64 years of age.

Our heroes are passing away at a quicker and quicker rate.

And whilst my generation and younger is grappling with everything around us telling us to chase for approval, I find it interesting that we are gravitating towards the dead artists who were outsiders and did things their way.

Can anyone say ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’?

One can only imagine what his online presence would Freddie be still alive. The very notion amuses me.

And whilst the wave of love for Queen has been rekindled and passed on to generation Z courtesy of the film and a rock and roll story, Mark Hollis is a starkly contrasted kind of outsider.

A very introverted and quiet one.

Nevertheless, Hollis is an artist who still left his legacy and impact.

First, it was the synth pop anthems, the most famous probably being ‘it’s my life’ but the true magic of Hollis’s work comes later in Talk Talk’s career in two albums that showcased a defiance towards industry pressure and allowed the band to stick to it’s artistic integrity, ‘Spirit of Eden’ and ‘Laughing Stock’.

Both albums would go on to inspire the post rock movement in the 90s.

I’ll never forget the first time I listened to ‘Spirit of Eden’ all the way through. I sat in my studio with the lights off and a drink at hand. The entire experience was a cathartic one, the record can drift you off into a zen like state of mind.

The space of the music, the carefully selected sounds and elongated notes, the gradual build up of texture, a mumble of words followed by a crystal clear statement.

The record entirely resonated with me in the way I understand but can’t quite articulate at the same time. It’s a very powerful kind of music.

When was the last time you heard a record like that?

If you’re in your twenties, I’m not sure how many of you may have had this experience.

And what’s especially sad is music’s cultural relevance has reduced significantly. Music has become a coarse reflection of reality, a background noise, a state of mindlessness that boasts fame and fortune as opposed to personal fulfilment.

There are artists out there like that today but it’s hard for them to make waves in a time where we’ve got to grips with distribution, but no idea about marketing and there’s too much of everything.

But all the while, Talk Talk inspire me to be the kind of artist I want to be…my own artist.

You can do things your own way, you can stick with your gut and follow your own path and you can be an outsider.

It can be just about the music and you can be an introvert.

And the irony is that you’ll probably be more respected for it.

Rest in peace Mark Hollis. Thank you for the music.

https://open.spotify.com/album/4YXo7p7aubyVIbNLoVlBp9?si=h4R6u95oSiSzT9kY7xbtTg